EA's AI Learns To Play Battlefield 1
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"Self-learning agents aren't just a good replacement for old-fashioned bots, you can also apply machine learning to a number of fields, such as procedurally generated content, animation, voice generation, speech recognition and more." says SEED technical director

In recent years AI have evolved in playing basic games like old Atari games by Google’s Deep mind and beat world champions this time EA’s deep learning division, Search for Extraordinary Experiences Division (SEED) self-learn played something as complex as a modern AAA game.  The AI was smart enough to teach itself howto play Battlefield 1’s multiplayer.

EA’s showcased a brief video during the Game Developers Conference (via Gamasutra). The gameplay is of regular Battlefield 1 multiplayer experience.

However after 300 days of total gameplay experience of AI, it was unable to make and execute any sort of strategies and sometimes find itself stuck running in circles. It is smart enough though to adapt its behaviour based on certain triggers such as health and ammunition. "I'm confident they will do less silly stuff in the future, as they become more adept," said SEED technical director Magnus Nordin, adding that they while they are constantly improving, the process is slow.

"All players you see are controlled by a single neural network that has been trained to play the game from scratch through trial and error," EA said. "The agents have learned to adapt their behaviour if they are low on ammo or health. Everything the agents do is the result of previous gameplay experience. We only give them encouragement for playing the objective."

"Our short-term objective with this project has been to help the DICE team scale up its quality assurance and testing, which would help the studio to collect more crash reports and find more bugs," Nordin continued.

"In future titles, as deep learning technology matures, I expectself-learning agents to be part of the games themselves, as truly intelligent NPCs that can master a range of tasks, and that adapt and evolve over time asthey accumulate experience from engaging with human players.

"I have no doubt in my mind that neural nets will start to gradually make their way into games in the years to come. Self-learning agents aren't just a good replacement for old-fashioned bots, you can also apply machine learning to a number of fields, such as procedurally generated content, animation, voice generation, speech recognition and more."

SEED is located in Stockholm and Los Angeles. The group's mission is "to explore, build, and help define the future of interactive entertainment."

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